Diba’s MicroBarb Connection Fitting for Soft Tubing

Protects flexible tubing from compression and carryover

For micro-bore pump and pinch valve tubing applications, Diba has introduced MicroBarb™ connectors.  The chemically inert fittings provide a low-carryover connection between flexible pump tubing and semi-rigid fluoropolymer tubing.

Diba’s MicroBarb Connection Fitting for Soft Tubing

Diba’s MicroBarb Connection Fitting for Soft Tubing

Photo: http://halmapr.com/diba/Microbarb.jpg (655 KB)

Easy-to-use MicroBarb™ fittings stretch the inside diameter (ID) over the internal barb while compressing the tubing outside diameter (OD) in the female threaded fitting, for a secure fit that guards against leaks and carryover.  Constructed of Polyaryletheretherketone (PEEK™) plastic, the fittings are chemically inert and withstand high temperatures and pressures.

The MicroBarb™ works for any soft tubing including PVC, Silicone, Santoprene, Pharmed, Marprene, Viton, and Chemsure.  It accommodates all tubing ID sizes from 0.010 to 0.060 inches, and OD sizes from 0.062 to 0.156 inches. The reusable, flat bottom fittings are available in ¼-28 and M6 fitting configurations and can be ordered by industry-standard pump tubing color codes.

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New Line of Pinch Valves from Bio-Chem Fluidics

Design eliminates tubing snares and provides simple tube replacement

Micro fluidic valve and pump specialist Bio-Chem Fluidics has introduced a newly redesigned line of solenoid operated pinch valves for medical and IVD applications under its Bio-Chem Valve brand. The line, which includes the 075 and 100 series, features a reengineered body with smooth contours that allow easier insertion and removal of tubing without snares.

New Line of Pinch Valves from Bio-Chem Fluidics

New Line of Pinch Valves from Bio-Chem Fluidics

Photo: http://halmapr.com/bcf/BIO PinchValves2 EMAIL.jpg (926 KB)

Bio-Chem Fluidics’ pinch valves allow a large bore flow passage through a flexible tube, which is pinched off to produce a tight seal. Only the easily replaceable tubing comes into contact with the fluid, making the valves ideal for applications requiring frequent changes of the flow path. Pinch valves are available in both normally closed and normally open configurations.

The new design is constructed from chemically resistant materials to protect against corrosion caused by cleaning solutions, and easily meets Bio-Chem Fluidics’ 2 million cycle operating standard. Optional features, such as a tube sensor and manual override are available upon request.

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Fiberguide’s Plastic Clad Silica Fibres Offer Excellent UV and Infrared Transmission

Low and standard OH fibres feature plastic cladding to prevent fibre breakage

For medical, scientific and military applications, Fiberguide Industries offers a full line of low and standard hydroxyl concentration (OH) plastic coated silica fibres. The Anhydroguide™ and Superguide™ are low cost optical fibres that provide superior UV and infrared transmissions.

Fiberguide’s Plastic Clad Silica Fibres Offer Excellent UV and Infrared Transmission

Fiberguide’s Plastic Clad Silica Fibres Offer Excellent UV and Infrared Transmission

Photo: http://halmapr.com/fiberguide/FG PlasticCladSilica EMAIL.jpg (944 KB)

Fiberguide’s Anhydroguide fibre is constructed of a pure fused silica core, made by reacting silicon tetrachloride with oxygen using a plasma arc. This ensures a low residual OH for excellent infrared transmission. Superguide’s silica core is constructed in the same manner, only with an oxy-hydrogen flame instead of a plasma arc, which maximizes the fibre’s UV transmission properties.

Both fibres feature plastic cladding to protect the fibre during buffer stripping and prevent breakage, while increasing fibre strength and reducing static fatigue in humid environments. Fibres offer exceptional transmission in tight bends, with a high core-to-clad ratio and numerical aperture of 0.37. All materials used in construction are certified by NAMSA to USP Class VI for non-toxicity and biocompatibility.

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Crowcon Carbon Dioxide Detectors Keep Workers Safe in Italian Winery

CellarSafe and Xgard fixed CO2 detectors monitor gas levels in cellars

The Selvapiana winery in Italy’s Tuscany region is using Crowcon’s CellarSafe and Xgard fixed CO2 gas detectors to protect workers in the winery’s cellars. The units were installed by Parsec S.r.l., a company which works closely with Crowcon in the Italian wine industry.

Crowcon Carbon Dioxide Detectors Keep Workers Safe in Italian Winery

Crowcon Carbon Dioxide Detectors Keep Workers Safe in Italian Winery

Photo: http://www.halmapr.com/crowcon/Selvapiana.jpg (817 KB)

CO2 is a by-product of the fermentation process and, because it is heavier than air, it can spill out of fermenting tanks and sink to the winery floor, where it forms deadly, invisible pockets. Workers cleaning grape skins out of fermenting tanks are also in danger, as any remaining CO2 can deplete oxygen in the tanks to dangerously low levels. In fact, CO2 is a hazard throughout the winemaking (and brewing) process – right through to packaging and distribution. Long term exposure to as little 0.5% volume CO2 represents a toxic health hazard, while concentrations greater than 10% volume can lead to death. Its effective monitoring is therefore absolutely essential.

At Selvapiana two CellarSafe CO2 detectors and one Xgard CO2 detector are installed in the winery’s cellars. The CellarSafe units provide two levels of protection: firstly, if CO2 concentrations exceed a certain threshold, extractor fans are automatically triggered; secondly, an 82dB alarm is triggered to warn workers to vacate the cellar immediately. The Xgard detector is linked to a Parsec SAEn5000 control unit that constantly displays ambient CO2 levels on a computer screen in the control room.

Commenting on the installation, Parsec’s Leo Forte said, “The owners of Selvapiana take the safety of their workers extremely seriously and wanted the best and most reliable CO2 monitoring systems available. We did not hesitate to recommend Crowcon detectors for this installation – we are specialists in cellar design and we know from experience what does and doesn’t work. Since the installation we and the winery owners have been very satisfied with the performance of the Crowcon detectors.”

Selvapiana is a typical Tuscan wine farm consisting of the owner’s villa, the cellars and other buildings – now no longer used – such as the oil mill, the granary and the joiner’s workshop. In the Middle Ages, there were two towers at the centre of the estate, which may have been watchtowers or part of a small castle. Today they are incorporated within the buildings added in later periods (particularly during the Renaissance).

More information on Crowcon’s safety products for wineries and breweries can be found at www.crowcon.com . A copy of the company’s new Winery and Brewery Industry brochure can also be obtained by e-mailing sales@crowcon.com .

Indian contact details:
Kishore Degwekar, Managing Director
Detection Instruments Pvt. Ltd.
Plot No. El-36, Electronics Zone
TTC Industria Area, MIDCl – Mahape
Navi Mumbai 400 710
India
Tel: 022 2761 7663 / 64 / 65 / 66, Fax: 022 2761 2103
E-mail: general@detection-india.com / sales@detection-india.com
Website: www.detection-india.com

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Optical Beam Smoke Detectors: Getting the Best from Beams

Efficient and effective wide-area fire detection

Large, wide-area indoor spaces present a challenge to traditional fire safety systems: in order to effectively detect smoke over such a space, complex networks of multiple overlapping sensors will be required.  Optical beam smoke detectors, on the other hand, are designed exactly for such situations – one single unit installed on a wall can detect smoke over an area of up to 1500m2 (BS5839) or 19,800 sq ft (NFPA 72).  More coverage per detector means fewer detectors, with associated reductions to the time and cost of installation and wiring, as well as a lesser aesthetic intrusion.  Mounting on the wall as opposed to the ceiling enables convenient access for maintenance, and a low-level controller further speeds and eases the process.  A space which might need as many as 15 point detectors could therefore be maintained from one single low-level controller, as opposed to organising height access to 15 different spots.

There is already a lively debate about the relative merits and drawbacks of different detection systems.  A common theme is that beam detection may not be as reliable or trouble-free as other methods, however this is almost always due to incorrect installation.  Beams, in fact, can be much more suitable for some situations than other detection systems, and this article will explain how to get the best from beams.

How it all works

Let there be light
An optical beam smoke detector works on the principle of smoke particles interfering with the transmission and reception of a beam of infra-red (IR) light.  A transmitter sends out a beam of IR light, and a receiver a set distance away measures the amount of IR light received.  When smoke enters the beam’s path, the intensity of IR received is reduced; when this reduction reaches a pre-defined limit the alarm signal is triggered and sent to a fire control panel.

Most beam detector systems consist of a transmitter, receiver and control unit.  The transmitter projects the beam, the receiver at the ‘end’ of the beam measures its intensity with a photosensitive sensor, and the control unit analyses and interprets the signal before communicating the detector’s status to a fire control panel.  These three elements can either be entirely separate or completely integrated, depending on the system chosen.  When the transmitter and receiver are in the same unit, a prismatic panel is fitted to the opposite wall where the receiver would normally go, reflecting the beam back to the source – and further reducing wiring requirements.

FFE multihead transceivers

FFE multihead transceivers

A good visual analogy is a torch beam of visible light: the beam expands outwards in a cone, its intensity dropping with distance from the central axis.  Beam detectors essentially detect how much ‘darker’ the end of the beam has become due to smoke interference.  In a torch light, as with IR, beams can cross without scattering, which is what allows reflective beam systems to function.  IR light is used as it is significantly affected by both smoke particles and the heat haze of a fire, and is invisible to the human eye – somewhat less intrusive than an actual torch beam.

Combating common problems
A minor, gradual increase in obscuration is not typical of smoke interference, but might well be due to dust and dirt build-up on the active surfaces.  Software in more advanced beam detectors can detect this slow change, and increase the gain (a form of signal amplification) to automatically compensate for this.  By contrast, sudden and very high beam obscuration is almost certainly a solid object in the beam’s path, and will trigger a ‘Fault’ status so that the path can be cleared.  In this way, ‘intelligent’ beam detector systems are able to perform accurately and effectively over a long period of time and with minimal manual maintenance.

Types of Beam detectors and their specific advantages

End-to-End vs. Reflective
As their names suggest, and has been touched upon already, there are two fundamental types of beam detectors.  End-to-end systems have the transmitter and receiver on opposite sides of the area to be protected.  They can be up to 100m apart, and the receiver can be connected to a control unit installed at ground level for easy maintenance.  Reflective systems have the beam transmitter and receiver in the same housing (a transceiver), with a reflective plate on the opposite wall.  This can still be up to 100m away, and the plate is prismatic so that it will reflect the beam straight back even if it is not mounted perpendicularly to the transmission path.

End-to-end systems are relatively unaffected by stray reflections from surrounding surfaces and obstructions near the beam path.  A reflective system, although potentially susceptible to objects near its line of sight, is easier to install and requires less wiring as power is only needed by the single transceiver unit.  Essentially, end-to-end beam detectors can operate effectively through narrower ‘gaps’, and will often be more suitable in more confined areas or those with many obstructions (‘busy’ roof spaces for example).  For spaces where this is not an issue, reflective systems will usually be more convenient.

Very recently, technology was also developed that allows the use of multiple transceiver heads running on one single controller.  This enables cost-effective protection for larger areas, and improved coverage options for unorthodox indoor spaces.

Motorised vs. Manual Adjustment
New developments in beam detection technology have led to a choice between inexpensive simplicity and intelligent automation.  Traditionally, adjusting the beam’s power and direction would have to be performed manually at the time of installation, and then maintained over time to compensate for dust build-up and ‘building shift’.  This is where building elements can gradually move in very slight increments, affecting the beam’s aim and effectiveness.  Recently, the option has become available to choose automated, motorised beam adjustment.  This technology uses data from the unit over time to automatically adjust its direction and sensitivity to keep the beam accurately aligned and the signal at an optimum level.  This is fast, reliable, and eases installation as well as reducing both the need and time taken for continued maintenance.

Beams vs. Other Detectors

The right tool for the right job
As already mentioned, by their nature beam detectors cover a huge area, and thus require less units and wiring than other detector types, but there are other things to consider as well.  Beams are less affected than other types of detector by high ceilings, harsh environments and airflow blowing smoke away.  As a smoke plume rises it becomes less dense, which leads to a maximum operating height for point detectors since the particle density can fall below the alarm threshold.  Since a beam operates over a linear path, the density of the plume has no effect – only the total number of smoke particles in the beam path.  As the plume widens, it involves more of the beam, making beam detectors more effective as height increases compared to other detectors.

Blowing smoke
Similarly, airflows that might blow smoke away from point detectors’ tiny sensor chambers are going to have less effect on the long, wide detection pattern of a beam system.  Dust and dirt build-up is taken care of by automatic beam signal strength compensation, and extreme temperatures have relatively little effect on the technology – there are even beam detectors suitable for use in explosive atmospheres.

A related, but separate problem can occur when a rising smoke plume draws in surrounding air and cools rapidly as it rises, sometimes actually becoming colder than the air above it.  In this situation, most commonly seen in high-ceilinged spaces, the smoke spreads out below the layer of warm air, as though trapped under an ‘invisible ceiling’ of its own.  This is known as stratification, and it can render ceiling-mounted detectors ineffective due to the lack of smoke particles reaching them.  A typical solution to this problem involves installing supplementary detection at lower levels to detect the stratified layer or even the plume itself.  Beam detectors are wall-mounted, typically up to 600mm below ceiling level, thereby giving them a significant advantage in detecting stratification layers.

Breathe easy
High Sensitivity Smoke Detection (HSSD) or aspirating systems are another option for large indoor spaces, however they suffer from their complexity and installation requirements.  A network of end-caps, sampling pipes, brackets, elbows and labels must be designed, fitted and maintained, which can be costly and inconvenient.  The aspirating pipe itself can also be quite obtrusive, and hiding it requires yet further cost and complexity from installing capillary tubes and drilling into the ceiling.

Getting the best out of Beams

Golden rules for a successful installation
As with almost all technology, an optical beam detector will work much better if it is properly installed and maintained.  Most reported and ‘common knowledge’ problems with beam detection actually stem from improper installation and usage, but can be easily avoided by following some basic rules coupled with common sense.

A Stable Base
Beam detector elements must be mounted on rigid, stable surfaces to limit the risk of misalignment: as with a torch, a tiny change in the transmitter’s angle will cause a large movement at the other end of the beam.  Common problems come from mounting beams on potentially flexible building surfaces such as cladded walls or on free-hanging assemblies.  Even building purlins can move, particularly subject to ambient temperature changes causing contractions and expansions, so are not recommended as stable fixing points.  So, if direct mounting onto brick or block walls is not possible, it is recommended that beam components be installed onto secure, rigid metal-frame assemblies suspended from RSJs (rigid steel joists).

Bean Detectors - a stable base

Bean Detectors - a stable base

Reflection Perfection
Reflective optical beam detectors can be affected by objects or surfaces close to the line of sight between the beam and reflector.  Obstructions will not only interfere with the received signal, cutting the IR intensity, but could leave areas hidden by their ‘shadow’.  If an obstructive surface were mistakenly used for alignment during initial installation, it would leave the area behind it completely unprotected.  Confirming correct alignment is therefore vital, with cover-up tests of the reflector a sound method for ensuring that the whole area is properly protected.

Obstructions can impair reflective beam systems

Obstructions can impair reflective beam systems

IR Interference
Beam receivers should always be positioned to avoid other sources of IR light.  In the first instance, where multiple beam detectors are in effect, each receiver should only have its associated transmitter’s beam falling on it.  If it is within the beam of another detector system, ‘crosstalk’ can occur producing false ‘Fire’ and ‘Fault’ conditions.  If two systems must be daisy-chained to cover a long distance, the transmitters should be mounted back-to-back rather than the reflectors or receivers, so as to minimise interference.  Other strong IR light sources, such as direct sunlight, can cause IR saturation whereby – much as with the human eye – it will be too ‘bright’ to function properly.  Normal fluorescent lights emit very little IR light, though incandescent bulbs, sodium lamps and camera flashes emit more; beams should be positioned to avoid such stray light falling directly onto the receiver.

Correct ‘back-to-back’ transmitter placement

Correct ‘back-to-back’ transmitter placement

Spacing
Standards such as EN54-12 and UL268 dictate the design and construction of optical beam smoke detectors.  It is important to note, however, that beam installation is governed by the relevant National Code of Practice.  Codes can vary by territory in their definition of the accepted width of coverage of a beam, and its allowable height from the ceiling.  The operating range (linear distance) for a beam is dictated by the manufacturer’s design and the approval gained for each beam detector product.

Things that go ‘bump’ in the night’
One last, occasional concern is that various ‘creatures of the night’ – bats and owls, usually – might set off false alarms by flying along the apex of a gabled or pitched roof.  Although this could conceivably be a problem, some beam detection systems can have a delay timing set.  This would then only send a fault or fire signal after that condition had been registered for a certain time – long enough for any flying trespassers to flit away again.

Conclusion

Light at the end of the tunnel (and warehouse, hangar, auditorium…)
This article has explained the mystery of optical beam smoke detection, its viability and benefits, and how to get the best out of it.  In short, beam detectors are an excellent option for wide-area smoke detection, covering much larger areas than point-type smoke detectors and with minimal wiring requirements compared to smoke aspirating systems.  Different beam systems are available to suit different projects, depending on issues of cost, wiring and space.  Possibly the most important point though is that even the best technology in the world is worth nothing if it is not used correctly, so following the golden rules for installation is vital for safety and success.  Bearing this information in mind, optical beam smoke detection can – and should – be considered a leading light in fire protection systems for large indoor areas.

Author
Jon Ben is Technical Director at Fire Fighting Enterprises Ltd.  His role includes responsibility for all product development, technical support and product training in the field of optical beam smoke detection.  Jon has over 25 years experience in highly regulated manufacturing industries and has brought many world-class products to market in the defence, industrial, medical and fire sectors.

For more information please contact:
Vishwajeet Thakar
India Manager
Fire Fighting Enterprises
Halma India
201 Hyde Park, Saki Vihar Road
Powai, Mumbai, Maharashtra, 400 072
Tel: 022 6708 0400, Fax: 022 6708 0415
E-mail: vthakar@ffeuk.com
Website: www.ffeuk.com

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Shanghai Swimming Pools Choose Palintest Water Testing Kits

Pooltest photometers and test strips are accurately measuring chlorine, pH and water transparency

The swimming pools at Jiangwan Sports Centre and the International Gymnastics Centre in Shanghai have recently upgraded their water testing equipment to ensure that the highest standards of health and hygiene are maintained for the local communities and competitors.

Several Pooltest 3, 5 and 9 photometers are now being used, in addition to Pooltest test strips, to accurately monitor the legally required chlorine, pH and transparency levels of the pool water. In addition, the handheld analysers are used to measure various other water balance characteristics above and beyond the necessary minimum to make the swimming experience as pleasant and beneficial as possible.

Shanghai International Gymnastics Centre Pool

Shanghai International Gymnastics Centre Pool

Photo 1 – Shanghai International Gymnastics Centre Pool:
http://halmapr.com/palintest/pal0609chinapools1.jpg (671 KB)

Both pools are prestigious and popular, with the Jiangwan Sports Centre complex a protected municipal heritage site and the Gymnastics Centre having the largest public pool in the province. Both have 50 metre indoor heated pools, each seeing between 700-2000 visitors a day depending on the time of week and year. The Jiangwan Sports Centre is the designated training centre for Shanghai, and both pools have been used as training venues for Olympic competitors. With these considerations of both high usage and high quality, keeping the water in excellent condition is of obvious great importance.

Jiangwan Sports Centre Pool, Shanghai

Jiangwan Sports Centre Pool, Shanghai

Photo 2 – Jiangwan Sports Centre Pool:
http://halmapr.com/palintest/pal0609chinapools2.jpg (711 KB)

Detailed, readily-available knowledge of the water characteristics in a pool allows treatments to be specifically tailored and applied in the correct amounts to keep the pool clean, clear, and friendly – enough disinfectant to be safe, but not so much as to be a potential irritant to swimmers. With quick, easy, on-site testing that doesn’t require extensive training to ensure accurate readings, this optimal balance is much easier to achieve, and the Pooltest range from Palintest is designed with this in mind.

Jiangwan Sports Centre Exterior, Shanghai

Jiangwan Sports Centre Exterior, Shanghai

Photo 3 – Jiangwan Sports Centre Exterior :
http://halmapr.com/palintest/pal0609chinapools3.jpg (617 KB)

The Pooltest strips, as well as the 3, 5 and 9 photometers, are used to monitor a wide range of parameters: pH, hardness, alkalinity, cyanuric acid, ozone, copper, bromine, and both free and total chlorine levels. The Pooltest units are handheld, waterproof, and use accurate photometric analysis to provide a digital readout on the integrated display.

Pool water monitoring and treatment at both of these sites is carried out by Shanghai Pool Water Treatment Co. Ltd., who switched to using Palintest products as their preferred water testing equipment due to their ease of use, versatility and accuracy. The company also cooperates with the Shanghai Inspection Bureau, which has also ordered several Pooltest units for legal monitoring purposes.

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New NeoFox Sport Handheld Optical Oxygen Sensor from Ocean Optics

Fluorescence-based optical oxygen sensor is portable and battery-operated

The NeoFox Sport is a portable, handheld optical oxygen sensor for measuring dissolved and gaseous oxygen pressure in a variety of media. The sensor uses a proprietary sol-gel coating that is embedded with an oxygen indicator and can be applied to patches or probes. Patches are useful for measuring headspace gases and other parameters inside packages and containers; probe options range from slender, 300 µm-diameter fibre assemblies for fine spatial resolution applications to robust, ¼-inch OD stainless steel configurations for process environments. Coating formulations are available for general lab use, high-sensitivity applications and hydrocarbon-rich sample environments.

New NeoFox Sport Handheld Optical Oxygen O2 Sensor from Ocean Optics

New NeoFox Sport Handheld Optical Oxygen O2 Sensor from Ocean Optics

Photo: http://halmapr.com/oo/NeoFoxSport.jpg (600 KB)

Comprised of a probe- or patch-based oxygen sensor, plus a phase fluorometer, the NeoFox Sport fluorescence-based optical oxygen system includes an onboard microprocessor with low-power OLED display, a user interface and a battery pack. The user interface permits such functions as setting single- or multi-point calibration and displaying oxygen readings in percent oxygen, partial pressure, moles per litre and other parameters. Data is captured and stored to a 2-GB SD card for retrieval on the NeoFox Sport itself or via an SD card reader connected to a PC. Response times range from <1.0 seconds in gas to ~30 seconds in liquids, with dissolved oxygen range (O2% at 1 Atmosphere) of 0-100% for most applications.

NeoFox Sport sensors combine the best of advances in materials sciences and phase fluorometry. A fluorescence-based transducer material is trapped in a sol-gel coating that is applied to the probe or patch. When the material or indicator changes optical properties in response to specific analytes in its immediate environment, the NeoFox Sport measures the response. Unlike polarographic and galvanic oxygen meters, the NeoFox Sport optical oxygen sensor is immune to environmental changes in pH, salinity and ionic strength. Other advantages of optical oxygen sensors include no sample consumption, no need for frequent calibration and no interference from electromagnetic interference.

Optional add-on accessories for NeoFox Sport include a battery-life extender for up to 25 hours of continuous operation and a field-friendly carrying pack with shoulder strap. OEM options are also available.

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Customised Labsphere LED Test System Supplied to Shanghai Research Centre of Engineering and Technology for Solid-State Lighting

A custom LED testing installation from light metrology industry leader Labsphere has been chosen by the Shanghai Research Centre of Engineering and Technology for Solid-State Lighting for its LED life measurement lab. The Institute supplies LED testing services to local manufacturers of solid state lighting. The powerful system is the first of its kind in China, with potential to become the national standard in LED testing.

Customised Labsphere LED Test System Supplied to Shanghai Research Centre of Engineering and Technology for Solid-State Lighting

Customised Labsphere LED Test System Supplied to Shanghai Research Centre of Engineering and Technology for Solid-State Lighting

Photo: http://halmapr.com/labsphere/ShanghaiSSL.jpg (904 KB)

Labsphere’s high performance and strong local support were the deciding factors for the Institute in selecting its system. Locally made systems currently offer testing of only one parameter of a single, low-power LED at a time. The integrated system from Labsphere is able to perform a variety of optical and electrical test measurements on an array of up to 20 discrete LEDs, including high power lamps, in under 60 seconds.

During a single measurement sequence, the life test station simultaneously produces optical measurements of total spectral radiance and luminous flux, peak and dominant wavelength, full width/half max, CIE purity and CIE chromaticity, as well as forward current, leakage current and reverse voltage electrical measurements. Labsphere’s powerful software gathers radiometric, photometric and colorimetric parameters used for analysis that meets requirements set by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

Labsphere’s life test station will enable the Institute to quickly and accurately test new products for its clients, increasing the reliability and energy performance of solid state lighting used in street lighting, architectural lighting and outdoor signage. There are no national standards for LED testing in China currently. The Institute hopes that this new system will bridge the gap left by traditional methods of LED testing to become the first national standard.

In addition to system performance, the quality of Labsphere’s sales support impressed the Institute. During system development, US staff flew to Shanghai to meet with the Institute face to face, along with Labsphere’s local sales and applications engineers. Now that the system is in place, Labsphere’s Shanghai-based team will be available on an ongoing basis for upgrades to meet evolving LED market needs.

“The Labsphere system is ideal as we will be able to upgrade it for certain applications. The system is also tailored specifically to new solid state lighting sources,” said Steven Li, the Institute’s General Evaluation Lab Manager.

According to Roger Xiao, Asia Pacific Sales Director of Labsphere, a key reason the Institute selected Labsphere is, “Labsphere can commit to the customer that we can help them with customization of software locally; also both parties can cooperate on building a SSL test and measurement platform that complies with international industry trends.”

For more information please contact Vikrant Mahajan, Labsphere’s Applications Engineering Manager, on e-mail: vmahajan@labsphere.com or telephone: +1 603 927 4266 (extension 2198).

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Rotary Lock from SERV Trayvou Guarantees Safety for Electro-Mechanical Applications

French safety specialist SERV Trayvou has launched in India the PERTK, a rotary lock for electro-mechanical applications. The PERTK is designed to isolate the electrical supply of high-inertia machines, such as mixers and crushers or robotic assembly lines.  The device’s safety contacts allow the condition of the control circuit to be determined by a separate value, for example zero speed, pressure or temperature.

Rotary Lock from SERV Trayvou Guarantees Safety for Electro-Mechanical Applications

Rotary Lock from SERV Trayvou Guarantees Safety for Electro-Mechanical Applications

Photo: http://www.halmapr.com/SERV/pertk.jpg (519KB)

The lock works according to the trapped-key principle.  When it receives an authorisation signal, an LED lights up to let the operator know that it is now safe to access the dangerous area.  The operator then pushes the lock’s button, removes the previously-trapped key and gains access to the installation.  While the key is retained by the operator, the machine cannot be re-started.

Supplied as standard with a light and an energy-saving button, the lock is available in 24, 48, 110 and 220V AC or DC versions.  The safety contacts can be configured as 4NO, 2NO/1NC or 3NO/1NC.  The number of contacts can be increased according to requirements.

The PERTK is also available without a button or warning LED, and can feature an electromagnet with a 100% duty ratio.  Whatever the chosen option, the lock can be supplied in an IP- or ATEX-compliant enclosure. The PERTK’s small dimensions make it easy to install and the lock can be used in harsh environments.

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Volk’s New SLT Lens Provides Clear Chamber Angle Views

Designed specifically for Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty procedures

Tailored to the unique needs of Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty procedures, Volk Optical’s new SLT Lens provides detailed, high resolution views of the anterior chamber angle for examination and laser spot placement.

Volk’s New SLT Lens Provides Clear Chamber Angle Views

Volk’s New SLT Lens Provides Clear Chamber Angle Views

Photo: http://halmapr.com/volk/SLT Release.jpg (612 KB)

The SLT’s single internally reflecting surface, the preferred standard for SLT procedures, delivers 1.0x magnification, maintaining laser spot size and power density.  Its curved upper lens surface ensures the laser beam profile remains circular, for consistent laser spot placement.  The contact lens design, used with a coupling fluid, provides stability for laser delivery.  These qualities also make the SLT lens suitable for all laser trabeculoplasty procedures.

High grade acrylic construction maintains superior resolution for the best possible image quality.  Internal surfaces around the lens are treated to eliminate light diffusion.  A smaller profile simplifies manipulation of the SLT lens, especially in a patient with a deep set eye or brow.

For more information please contact Mahadev Dhuri, Volk’s India Sales Manager, on e-mail  Mahadev.dhuri@halma.com , telephone 022 6708 0400 or cell phone on 9930 311090.

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