Hanovia showing Performance Qualified UV Disinfection at Asiawater 2014

British UV disinfection specialist Hanovia is introducing its new Performance Qualified (PQ) UV disinfection technology at Asiawater 2014 in Malaysia this March. The company’s PQ range will be shown by its local partner Repassa Engineering Sdn Bhd at Booths B210 & 212. Asiawater is Asia’s leading water and wastewater industry trade show.

Hanovia PureLine and PharmaLine PQ UV disinfection system

Hanovia PureLine and PharmaLine PQ UV disinfection system

Ms. Xu Ying, Hanovia’s Asia-Pacific Regional Manager has also been invited to give a keynote speech at the Asiawater Technology Symposium, which is held concurrently with the exhibition.

Designed specifically to provide performance-qualified UV disinfection of water in the food, beverage, pharmaceutical and other high purity applications, Hanovia’s PQ system provides the ultimate process security with performance validation from an authoritative 3rd party. All PQ systems provide real-time UV monitoring (including self-compensation for varying water quality), validated UV dose calculations and simple-to-use smart controls. These all add up to maximum biosecurity for the production process and maximum peace of mind for the user.

“By working with our excellent local partner Repassa we’ve already achieved many successful installations across South East Asia, with great feedback from the customers,” commented Ms. Ying. “Meanwhile, supported by an increasingly regulated and safety-conscious market, we’ve also noticed a strong need for advanced UV technology from many requiring high purity processing water, including food, beverage and pharmaceutical.”

She added: “Asiawater is the perfect platform to introduce our state-of-the-art technology to the Asian market and help manufacturers improve productivity and have peace of mind at the same time.”

Founded in 1924, Hanovia is celebrating its 90th anniversary this year. The company has always been a pioneer in UV technology for disinfection and chemical reduction applications. By working with the biggest names in food, beverage, electronics, pharmaceutical, aquaculture, pools and leisure, and many other industries, Hanovia offers the finest UV solutions to our customers.

For more information please contact:
Ying Xu
Hanovia Asia-Pacific Office
Tel: +86 (10) 6588 6200, Fax: +86 (10) 6588 8311
E-mail: Ying.Xu@hanovia.com / asiapacific@hanovia.com
Website: www.hanovia.com

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Using UV Disinfection to Ensure Bio-Security in the Pharmaceutical, Food and Beverage Industries

Introduction
The pharmaceutical and food & beverage industries are unique in that their products are either consumed directly or are used in products that are actively consumed by people. In an increasingly regulated and safety-conscious market, these industries have to meet ever more stringent standards on water quality and bio-security.

It is vital to treat the water used in the manufacturing process to remove toxins, biohazards and any unwanted organic materials, while at the same time not incurring any residual taste, colour or reagents that could affect another part of the downstream process. In these industries the ‘raw’ potable water they source at the start of the process may not be completely free of bio-challenges, as needed for their individual processes, resulting in active growth of microorganisms to harmful levels.

UV disinfection for processing

UV disinfection for processing

UV is ideal for these applications as it is both effective and chemical-free. It eliminates all known pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, yeasts and moulds (and their spores) and is low maintenance and environmentally friendly.

In this article Mark Aston, Hanovia’s Technical Manager, discusses the importance of UV in ensuring bio-security.

The importance of bio-security
Bio-security is very important to understand from both the supplier and customer perspective. It is a fine balancing act between providing an appropriately-sized treatment system on the one hand while ensuring viable cost of ownership on the other.

Where a UV system is required to target a specific bacteria, virus or other bio-hazard, the precise minimum dose needed to achieve the required reduction of that hazard must be well characterised and monitored in delivery. Three general types of system can be used for this task:

  • Very cost-effective systems monitored for a minimum lamp intensity that achieve a minimum delivered dose which is not defined
  • Cost-effective systems that have been referenced to known validations and therefore offer an assured bio-security, but without the absolute cost of a full validation
  • Costly systems that have been fully validated to monitor the precise dose delivered and the power of the system controlled to continually deliver that required dose

How UV disinfection works
UV is the part of the electromagnetic spectrum between visible light and X-rays. The specific portion of the UV spectrum between 185-400nm (known as UV-C) has a strong germicidal effect, with peak effectiveness at 265nm. At these wavelengths UV eliminates microorganisms by penetrating their cell membranes and damaging the DNA, making them unable to reproduce and effectively killing them.

A typical UV disinfection system for process water or liquid ingredient consists of a UV lamp housed in a protective quartz sleeve and mounted within a cylindrical stainless steel chamber. The liquid to be treated enters at one end and passes along the entire length of the chamber before exiting at the other end. Virtually any liquid can be effectively treated with UV, including raw mains water, filtered process water, viscous sugar syrups, beverages and effluent.

There are no microorganisms known to be resistant to UV; this includes pathogenic bacteria such as Listeria, Legionella and Cryptosporidium (and its spores, which are resistant to chlorination).

UV dose
The UV dose necessary for microbial deactivation varies from one species to another and is measured in millijoules per square centimetre (mJ/cm2). Values for specific microorganisms have been experimentally established and are used to determine the type and size of UV system required.

The dose received by an organism in a UV treatment system is dependent on four main factors:

1.    The energy output of the UV source
2.    The flow rate of the fluid through the treatment chamber
3.    The transmission value (ability to transmit UV light) of the fluid being treated
4.    The geometry of the treatment chamber

By optimising these criteria, a UV system can be tailored to effectively treat large or small flows, as well as viscous fluids or those containing dissolved solids and high levels of starch or sugar compounds.

UV technologies
There are two main types of UV technology based on the UV lamps used: low pressure and medium pressure. Low pressure lamps have a ‘monochromatic’ UV output (limited to a single wavelength at 254nm), whereas medium pressure lamps have a ‘polychromatic’ UV output (between 185-400nm).

As UV has no residual effect, the best position for a treatment system is immediately prior to the point of use. This ensures incoming microbiological contaminants are destroyed and there is a minimal chance of post-treatment contamination.

UV applications in the pharmaceutical, food and beverage industries
Direct contact water
Although municipal water supplies are normally free from harmful or pathogenic microorganisms, this should not be assumed. In addition, water from private sources such as natural springs or boreholes could also be contaminated. Any water used as an ingredient, or that comes in direct contact with the product, can therefore be a source of contamination. UV disinfects this water without chemicals or pasteurisation. It also allows the re-use of process water, saving money and improving productivity without risking the quality of the product.

CIP (Clean-in-Place) rinse water
It is essential that the CIP final rinse water used to flush out foreign matter and disinfecting solutions is microbiologically safe. Fully automated UV disinfection systems can be integrated with CIP rinse cycles to ensure final rinse water does not reintroduce microbiological contaminants.

Filter disinfection
Reverse osmosis (RO) and granular activated carbon (GAC) are often used to filter process water, but can be a breeding ground for bacteria. UV is an effective way of disinfecting both stored RO and GAC filtered water and has been used in the process industries for many years.

GAC filters are also often used to dechlorinate process water, removing the ‘off’ flavours often associated with chlorine disinfection, meaning the flavour of the final product remains untainted and free from unwanted flavours or odours. Placing UV systems ahead of GAC filters used for dechlorination improves the performance of the filters and results in longer carbon runs, so decreasing operating costs.

As the usual dose for removing free chlorine is 15 to 30 times higher than the normal disinfection dose, an important additional benefit of using UV dechlorination is a high level of UV disinfection, reduction in Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and improved overall water quality at point-of-use.

TOC reduction
Short UV wavelengths (below 200nm) are highly effective at breaking down organic molecules present in water, commonly known as Total Organic Carbon (TOC), especially low molecular weight contaminants. This works in two ways: the first method is by direct photolysis, when energy from the UV actually breaks down chemical bonds within the organics; the second method is by the photolysis of water molecules, splitting them to create charged OH- radicals, which also attack the organics.

Cooling media and chiller disinfection
Some meat and dairy products are subject to contamination after heat treatment or cooking. UV provides an excellent way to protect foods from contamination by contact-cooling fluids.

Sugar syrups
Sugar syrups can be a prime breeding ground for microorganisms. Although syrups with very high sugar content do not support microbial growth, any dormant spores may become active after the syrup has been diluted. Treating the syrup and dilution water with UV prior to use will ensure any dormant microorganisms are deactivated.

Liquid sweeteners
Sucrose-based sweeteners can be a prime breeding ground for microorganisms. UV systems are available specifically for treating these syrups.

De-aerated liquor
De-aerated liquor is added as part of a high gravity brewing process, often in the packaging operation. This liquor is added directly to the beer so needs to be kept free from contamination by gram negative bacteria, which can cause off-flavours and acidity.

Yeast preparation
The problems associated with yeast preparation in breweries are well recognised and include hazes, altered fermentation and surface membranes on packaged beer. A single cell of Sacchoromyces (var. Turbidans) in 16 million cells of pitching yeast will cause detectable hazes. UV destroys all known yeasts and their spores.

Waste water
Effluent from pharmaceutical, food and beverage facilities can be treated without the use of environmentally hazardous chemicals. This ensures all discharges meet with local environmental regulations. As already mentioned, because process water can be treated and re-used with UV, this also leads to a significant reduction in the amount of waste water produced.

Conclusion
Meeting the increasingly rigorous hygiene standards required in the production of pharmaceutical, food and beverage products is a real challenge. If improvements need to be made to plant and equipment, they need to bring quick returns on the investment and measurable improvements in product quality.

For manufacturers seeking to improve the quality of the end product and to ensure the bio-security of their process, UV is an economic, realistic option. It is already an established method of disinfecting drinking water throughout the world, and is already widely used for high purity applications where water of the highest quality is essential.

UV disinfection systems are easy to install, with minimum disruption to the plant. They need very little maintenance, the only requirement being replacement of the UV lamps every 9 – 12 months, depending on use. This is a simple operation that takes only a few minutes and can be carried out by general maintenance staff.

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Visit Hanovia at Aquatech Amsterdam!

You’ll learn all about our PQ UV disinfection systems

If you’re going to Aquatech in Amsterdam, who not pop by Hanovia’s booth (Hall , stand ), meet the team and learn how the company’s PureLine and PharmaLine PQ (Performance Qualified) UV disinfection systems ensure the complete biosecurity of process water systems.

Hanovia PureLine and PharmaLine PQ UV disinfection system

Hanovia PureLine and PharmaLine PQ UV disinfection system

Tested and approved by independent experts, The PQ range guarantees 99.999% disinfection at its maximum bioassayed dose. A unique feature is its revolutionary, optimised, absolute intensity UV monitor which means the PQ’s controller automatically corrects the dose calculation as UV transmittance varies – without the need for an external UV transmittance monitor.

Product selection is simple with the entire PQ range: all that’s needed to choose the correct model is the application and the required flow – the appropriate model is then simply selected from the appropriate datasheet. Hanovia will have already specified the necessary dose, chamber geometry, lamp type, surface finish, seal materials and connections that are typically required by that application.

You can also contact Hanovia’s Marketing Manager, Gunvinder Bhogal (gunvinder.bhogal@hanovia.com) in advance to arrange a one-to-one meeting with a UV specialist at the show.

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Food, Beverage, Pharma and Leisure Industry companies flock to Hanovia’s UV Seminar in Indonesia

Offering ideas and practical advice on using UV for industrial water bio-security, the day proves a real hit

Following the enthusiastic response to Hanovia’s inaugural UV seminar held in Dubai last year, the company hosted its second seminar in Jakarta, Indonesia last month. The event was packed with ideas, practical advice and in-depth analysis on the use of UV for bio-security in the food, beverage, pharmaceutical and leisure industries.

Food, Beverage, Pharma and Leisure Industry companies flock to Hanovia’s UV Seminar in Indonesia

Food, Beverage, Pharma and Leisure Industry companies flock to Hanovia’s UV Seminar in Indonesia

The seminar attracted key international and local companies from the food, beverage, pharmaceutical and other industries, including the swimming pool, leisure and hotel industries. The presentations delivered key industry benefits on using UV and the latest industry standards. There were also hands-on demonstrations of the latest UV systems and one-to-one consultation with representatives from Hanovia and PKMG, Hanovia’s representative in Indonesia.

The seminar received an overall 5 Star rating from attendees, with 100% agreement on it being a ‘very informative and educational event’ which provided something for everyone. Sales Director Tim McDougle commented: “Asia, and particularly Indonesia, is a target growth market for all industries, especially food, beverage and pharmaceuticals. By attending this educational seminar all the attendees have learnt about the latest UV developments and UV’s importance in ensuring bio-security for their products.”

Also covered during the day was a demonstration on Hanovia’s Performance Qualified (PQ) UV systems, which have been third party validated specifically for the food, beverage and pharmaceutical industries. It was shown how these systems offer step-change improvements in process security and ensure better quality water in critical, high purity applications.

Hanovia is already planning the next seminar – stay tuned for more information!

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Hanovia Appoints new Technical Director

UV disinfection specialist Hanovia has appointed Mark Aston as its new Technical Director.

Mark Aston, the new Technical Director at Hanovia.

Mark Aston, the new Technical Director at Hanovia.

Mark has over 25 years’ experience in developing profitable products from innovative technology.  He has held senior director roles in engineering companies operating in the electro-optical and bespoke engineering market sectors, including traditional and solid-state lighting technologies.

His role in Hanovia will be to implement new technology and product development programmes as well as consolidate planning for continuous improvement of Hanovia’s unique range of UV treatment products.

Mark has a BSc (Hons) in Physics and Astrophysics, a DSc in Optical Physics and is a Chartered Physicist and Honorary Research Fellow of University College, London.

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Hanovia planning second UV industry seminar – this time in Indonesia

Indonesia event follows on from successful inaugural Dubai seminar

UV disinfection specialist Hanovia Limited is hosting its second UV industry seminar with ideas and practical advice on the use of UV in the food and beverage, pharmaceutical, pools and leisure and building services industries.

To be held on April 11 in Jakarta, Indonesia, it follows on from the enthusiastic response to the inaugural seminar held in Dubai last year.

With talks by industry leaders and in-house Hanovia staff visitors will hear directly from experts about how to make significant improvements to their water disinfection processes by exploiting clean UV technology.

There will also be hands-on demonstrations of the latest UV systems and one-to-one consultation with specialist speakers and representatives from PKMG, an Indonesian engineer and supplier of process water technology.

In particular, the seminar will discuss performance qualified (PQ) UV systems developed specifically for the food and beverage and pharmaceutical industries. Delegates will learn how these systems offer step-change improvements in process security and ensure better quality water in critical, high purity applications.

Date: April 11, 2013
Location: Hotel Mulia, Jakarta, Indonesia
Agenda and registration form: http://www.hanovia.com/indonesia-seminar-registration/#reg-form

For more information please contact:
Mr Gunvinder Bhogal, Marketing Manager
Hanovia Limited
Tel: +44 (0)1753 515300
E-mail: gunvinder.bhogal@hanovia.com
Website: www.hanovia.com

Ms Ying Xu, Asia-Pacific Manager
Hanovia Limited
Tel: +86 (0)10 6588 6200, Mobile: +86 1370 1235137
E-mail: ying.xu@hanovia.com
Website: www.hanovia.com

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UV disinfection technology – the applications just keep on growing

Introduction

Ultraviolet (UV) technology was originally used to ensure the adequate disinfection of municipal drinking water. Since its introduction over 40 years’ ago it is now applied globally for disinfection, TOC (total organic carbon) reduction, de-ozonation and de-chlorination of water in many different industries, including food and beverage industries, pharmaceutical manufacturing, aquaculture, pools and leisure, shipping and oil drilling.

UV kills all known spoilage microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, yeasts and moulds (and their spores). It is a low maintenance, environmentally friendly technology which eliminates the need for chemical treatment while ensuring high levels of disinfection.

In this article Jon Ryan, Managing Director of Hanovia Limited, discusses the myriad applications where UV is now routinely used on a daily basis worldwide.

How UV disinfection works

UV is the part of the electromagnetic spectrum between visible light and X-rays. The specific portion of the UV spectrum between 185-400nm (known as UV-C) has a strong germicidal effect, with peak effectiveness at 265nm. At these wavelengths UV eliminates microorganisms by penetrating their cell membranes and damaging the DNA, making them unable to reproduce and effectively killing them.

A typical UV disinfection system consists of a UV lamp housed in a protective quartz sleeve and mounted within a cylindrical stainless steel chamber. The liquid to be treated enters at one end and passes along the entire length of the chamber before exiting at the other end. Virtually any liquid can be effectively treated with UV, including water, sugar syrups, beverages and effluent.

There are no microorganisms known to be resistant to UV – this includes pathogenic bacteria such as Listeria, Legionella and Cryptosporidium (and its spores, which are resistant to chlorination). The UV dose necessary for deactivation varies from one species to another and is measured in millijoules per square centimetre (mJ/cm2). Values for specific microorganisms have been experimentally established and are used to determine the type and size of UV system required.

The dose received by an organism in a UV treatment system is dependent on four main factors:

1.    The energy output of the UV source
2.    The flow rate of the fluid through the treatment chamber
3.    The transmission value (ability to transmit UV light) of the fluid being treated
4.    The geometry of the treatment chamber

By optimising these criteria, a UV system can be tailored to effectively treat large or small flows, as well as viscous fluids or those containing dissolved solids and high levels of starch or sugar compounds.

There are two main types of UV technology based on the type of UV lamps used: low pressure and medium pressure. Low pressure lamps have a monochromatic UV output (limited to a single wavelength at 254nm), whereas medium pressure lamps have a polychromatic UV output (with an output between 185-400nm).

Benefits of UV Disinfection

UV disinfection has many advantages over alternative methods. Unlike chemical treatment, UV does not introduce toxins or residues into process water and does not alter the chemical composition, taste, odour or pH of the fluid being disinfected.

UV treatment can be used for primary water disinfection or as a back-up for other water purification methods such as carbon filtration, reverse osmosis or pasteurisation. Since UV disinfection does not rely on a chemical residual, the location(s) of the units should be carefully considered for optimum performance.

UV applications

Food, beverage and brewing industries

Disinfection of direct contact water
Although municipal water supplies are normally free from harmful or pathogenic microorganisms, this should not be assumed. In addition, water from private sources such as natural springs could also be contaminated. Any water used as an ingredient, or coming in direct contact with the product, can therefore be a source of contamination. UV disinfects this water without chemicals or pasteurisation. It also allows the re-use of process water, saving money and improving productivity without risking the quality of the product.

CIP (Clean-in-Place) rinse water
It is essential that the CIP final rinse water used to flush out foreign matter and disinfecting solutions is microbiologically safe. Fully automated UV disinfection systems can be integrated with CIP rinse cycles to ensure final rinse water does not reintroduce microbiological contaminants. Because of their high energy density, MP lamps are less affected by any sudden changes in the temperature of the CIP water than a LP lamp.

Filter disinfection
Reverse osmosis (RO) and granular activated carbon (GAC) are often used to filter process water, but can be a breeding ground for bacteria. UV is an effective way of disinfecting both stored RO and GAC filtered water and has been used in the process industries for many years.

Cooling media and chiller disinfection
Some meat and dairy products are subject to contamination after heat treatment or cooking. UV provides an excellent way to protect foods from contamination by contact-cooling fluids.

Sugar syrups
Sugar syrups can be a prime breeding ground for microorganisms. Although syrups with very high sugar content do not support microbial growth, any dormant spores may become active after the syrup has been diluted. Treating the syrup and dilution water with UV prior to use will ensure any dormant microorganisms are deactivated.

Liquid sweeteners
Sucrose-based sweeteners can be a prime breeding ground for microorganisms. UV systems are available specifically for treating these syrups.

De-aerated liquor
De-aerated liquor is added as part of a high gravity brewing process, often in the packaging operation. This liquor is added directly to the beer so needs to be kept free from contamination by gram negative bacteria, which can cause off-flavours and acidity.

Yeast preparation
The problems associated with yeast preparation in breweries are well recognised and include hazes, altered fermentation and surface membranes on packaged beer. A single cell of Sacchoromyces (var. Turbidans) in 16 million cells of pitching yeast will cause detectable hazes. UV destroys all known yeasts and their spores.

Waste water
As part of a multi-barrier process, including filtration, UV can destroy microorganisms in the effluent from food and beverage facilities prior to discharge. As UV reduces reliance on hazardous chemicals, it also ensures all discharges meet with local environmental regulations.

Bromates and bottled water – UV as an alternative to ozonation

Nongfu Spring Co. Ltd., one of China’s leading producers of bottled water and beverages, has recently opted to use UV for its production plants across China. This is a major milestone in the bottled water industry – particularly in China – because presently in that country virtually all bottled water is disinfected using ozone. And around the world ozone is still the disinfection method of choice for many producers.

The decision by Nongfu Spring to opt for UV was driven by a number of reasons, not least of which was concerns about ozonation by-products such as bromate. In fact, Hanovia has noticed that more and more bottled water and soft drinks producers are now looking for ozone alternatives, and enquiries about UV are on the increase.

Bromide ions occur naturally in many spring waters and on their own pose no problem. However, the presence of ozone can cause conversion of bromide into bromate, with the consequent potential for consumer health problems. The World Health Organization (WHO) lists bromate as a carcinogenic substance and recommends its maximum limit in mineral water be set at 0.01mg/l (10ppb). In July 2008 the Chinese General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ), recommended in a revised draft national standard for drinking water and mineral water that a maximum limit for bromate in bottled water be in line the WHO guidelines. This limit has now been in force since October 2009.

Pharmaceutical industry

Disinfection
As in the food and beverage industries, UV is used to disinfect water used in the manufacturing process, whether it is for direct product make-up or for rinsing and washing process equipment.

TOC reduction
Short UV wavelengths (below 200nm) are highly effective at breaking down organic molecules present in water, especially low molecular weight contaminants. The process works in two ways: the first method is by direct photolysis, when energy from the UV actually breaks down chemical bonds within the organics; the second method is by the photolysis of water molecules, splitting them to create charged OH- radicals, which also attack the organics.

Dechlorination
To date, the two most commonly used methods of chlorine removal have been granular activated carbon (GAC) filters or the addition of neutralising chemicals such as sodium bisulphite and sodium metabisulphite. Both of these methods have their advantages, but they also have a number of significant drawbacks. GAC filters, because of their porous structure and nutrient-rich environment, can become a breeding ground for bacteria. Dechlorination chemicals such as sodium bisulphite, which are usually injected just in front of RO membranes, can also act as incubators for bacteria, causing biofouling of the membranes. In addition, these chemicals are hazardous to handle and there is a danger of over- or under-dosing due to human error.

UV is now becoming increasingly popular as an effective alternative method of dechlorination. It has none of the drawbacks of GAC or neutralising chemicals, while effectively reducing both free chlorine and combined chlorine compounds (chloramines) into easily removed by-products.

Aquaculture

Increased water extraction and lowered water quality can result in increased outbreaks of viral and bacterial fish diseases in the aquaculture industry. Due to the intensive nature of fish farming, fish stock is also highly susceptible to infection from natural fish populations in the water feeding the farm. To break the infection cycle between fish farms and natural fish populations, a disinfection system is needed to treat water entering and circulating within fish farms.

UV is ideally suited for these applications as it uses no chemicals and does not create by-products which would harm the fish stock, or other aquatic life, on discharge. Unlike other treatment methods, UV avoids the expense of complex monitoring systems involved in adding and removing chemicals before the water reaches the fish. In addition, it does not alter the pH of the water. Indeed, UV is the most economical disinfection technique that can be used in fish aquaculture. Applications include treatment of water in hatcheries, shell-fish purging tanks and fry rearing tanks, and recirculation water in marine parks and aquaria.

Swimming pools and spas

UV is now a well-established method of swimming pool water treatment, from hydrotherapy spas to full-sized competition pools. This growth in popularity has been largely due to UV’s reliability and ease of use. Another major factor is the reduced reliance on traditional chemical treatments it affords, particularly chlorine. UV is also highly effective at destroying chlorine-resistant microorganisms like Cryptosporidium and Giardia.

Some of the more unpleasant by-products of chlorination are chloramines, formed when chlorine reacts with sweat or urine in pool water. Trichloramines in particular are powerful irritants which are responsible for eye and respiratory complaints and the unpleasant smells commonly associated with indoor public pools. They are also corrosive and in time can lead to damage to pool buildings and structures such as ventilation ducts.

Another major benefit of UV is that it significantly reduces the need for backwashing and dilution, saving hundreds of pounds a month for pool operators.

Link between chloramines and asthma

A recent study found an increased incidence of asthma in children who swam regularly in chlorinated pools. In some cases the damage was equivalent to that found in heavy smokers. Even people sitting at the sides of pools, such as lifeguards and instructors, were found to be at risk.

The symptoms are caused, the researchers believe, by chloramines – particularly trichloramines. The problem is potentially so serious that the study’s authors suggested pool operators should seriously consider alternatives to chlorine-based disinfection. They also recommended better ventilation to help remove chloramine-laden air from pool surroundings, improved hygiene practices by bathers themselves – such as showering before swimming – and the regular renewal of pool water.

While further research is needed, these findings add further credence to the importance of reducing chloramines as much as possible.

Ship Ballast Water

All ocean-going vessels take on water to provide ballast and stability. It is usually taken on in coastal port areas and transported to the next port of call, where it may be discharged. The IMO (International Maritime Organisation) sets tough standards to treat all ballast water prior to discharge, and UV disinfection – in conjunction with filtration – is now one of the accepted methods of treatment.

Oil Drilling

The control of bacteria in injection water – the water injected back into an oil or gas reservoir to increase pressure and stimulate production – is vital in the oil and gas industry. Inadequate treatment can cause ‘souring’ of the reservoir with hydrogen sulphide gas or microbial induced corrosion of drilling equipment. Recent studies commissioned by Hanovia have shown that UV disinfection is effective at preventing bacterial contamination of injection water.

Conclusion

Meeting the increasingly rigorous hygiene standards required in the production of food, beverages and pharmaceuticals, as well water quality concerns in the leisure, aquaculture, shipping and oil drilling industries, is a real challenge. If improvements need to be made to plant and equipment, they need to bring quick returns on the investment and measurable improvements in product quality.

For manufacturers seeking to improve the quality of the end product, UV is an economic, realistic option. It is an established method of disinfecting drinking water throughout the world, and is now finding applications in many other industries.

UV disinfection systems are easy to install, with minimum disruption to the plant. They need very little maintenance, the only requirement being replacement of the UV lamps every 9 – 12 months, depending on use. This is a simple operation that takes only a few minutes and can be carried out by general maintenance staff.

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Hanovia’s Singapore Distributor Demonstrating the Company’s ‘Dry’ UV Monitor at Interphex Asia

Hanovia’s Singapore distributor, Repassa Singapore Pte Ltd, will be representing the company at Interphex Asia this May. Interphex Asia is the region’s leading trade show for the pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical industries.

The Hanovia ‘dry’ UV monitor for use with the company’s PharmaLine PQ UV disinfection system

The Hanovia ‘dry’ UV monitor for use with the company’s PharmaLine PQ UV disinfection system

(Caption: The Hanovia ‘dry’ UV monitor for use with the company’s PharmaLine PQ UV disinfection system)

Located at booth 312, Repassa will be offering demonstrations of Hanovia’s ‘dry’ UV monitor for use with the new PharmaLine PQ range of UV systems. The dry monitor is unique as it is located within the chamber, but outside the water flow. This allows the controller to automatically correct the dose calculation as UV transmittance varies, without the need for an external UV transmittance monitor. It provides absolute UV intensity monitoring in real-time and, because it remains outside the water flow, it can be removed and inspected without interrupting the process. The dry monitor also allows for field verification using a portable reference UV sensor.

Repassa will also have posters and brochures with information about Hanovia’s entire high purity UV disinfection product range.

For more information please contact:
Repassa Singapore Pte Ltd
No 5, Kaki Bukit Road 2, #01-01
Singapore 417839
Tel: +65 (6) 842 7391
E-mail: e-mail@repassa.com
Website: www.repassa.com

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Hanovia’s Malaysian distributor representing the company at AsiaWater 2012

Hanovia’s Malaysian distributor, Repassa Engineering Sdn Bhd, will be representing the company at AsiaWater 2012, one of Asia’s leading water and wastewater industry trade shows.

Located at booth Z312/Z313, the company will be displaying one of Hanovia’s ‘dry’ UV monitors. Located within the chamber but outside the water flow, the dry monitor allows the controller to automatically correct the dose calculation as UV transmittance varies without the need for an external UV transmittance monitor. As it remains outside the water flow, it can also be removed and inspected without interrupting the process. Repassa Engineering will also have posters and brochures with information about Hanovia’s entire UV disinfection product range.

Date: 27- 29th March, 2012
Location: Kuala Lumpur convention center, Malaysia

For more information please contact:
Repassa Engineering Sdn Bhd
Unit No. 11-3, Block D, Level 3,
Jalan PJU 1/39, Dataran Prima,
47301 Petaling Jaya
Selangor Darul Ehsan
Malaysia
Tel: +6 03 7806 1070, Fax: +6 03 7806 1077
E-mail: email@repassa.com
Website: www.repassa.com

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Hanovia Appoints Aqua Italy as Italian Distributor

UV disinfection specialist Hanovia has appointed Aqua Italy as a new Italian distributor. Aqua Italy will handle all sales enquiries and provide technical support for existing and new Hanovia products in all applications excluding the pool and leisure market.

Established in 1976, Aqua Italy has many years’ experience in the water treatment industry, particularly for pharmaceutical and other high purity processes. The company is internationally recognized for its expertise and wide range of water treatment capabilities, with a presence in many international markets, including South America, the Middle East and Russia.

Based in the United Kingdom, with a worldwide distributor network, Hanovia is a world leader in UV disinfection technology for industrial applications. The company has over 85 years’ experience in the design, development, manufacture and distribution of UV systems worldwide. Hanovia is a subsidiary of Halma p.l.c.

For further news stories from Hanovia and to subscribe to the Hanovia RSS News Feed please visit the Hanovia News Blog.

Aqua Italy’s contact details are as follows:
Aqua Italy srl
Viale F. Restelli, 3
20124 Milano
Italy
Tel: +39 02 8724 4551, Fax: +39 02 8724 4579
E-mail:  vilma.barbieri@aquaitaly.it
Website: www.aquaitaly.it

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