Wireless Fire Detection With XPander

Apollo has updated and extended its XPander range of wireless fire detectors. Designed for use in areas where hard-wired fire detection is impossible or impractical, XPander devices are ideal for use in historical or ornate buildings where the décor is of utmost importance and would be ruined by the installation of hard-wired devices.

Apollo extends the Xpander range of wireless fire detectors, ideal for historical buildings

Apollo extends the Xpander range of wireless fire detectors, ideal for historical buildings

They are also a good option for listed buildings, which may have strict rules regarding alteration to the original fabric of the structure. In these circumstances, channelling and wiring for traditional fire detection may cause unacceptable damage to the interior during installation.

The extended XPander range includes two new products and now consists of an optical smoke detector, a multisensor smoke detector, heat detector types A1R and CS, a wireless base, a manual call point, a sounder and a sounder beacon, and Single and Dual Input/Output Units. The complete range has been granted the new wireless link fire standard EN54 Part 25, which is the standard for European-compliant radio products.

Apollo’s wireless XPander has been designed to be used in conjunction with a standard fire detection system. XPander has an updated 31-device loop interface and connects to an XP95-compatible control panel via an interface which is wired to the loop. No special adjustment or programming is required and the devices are recognised by the control panel simply as another detector connected to the system.

The detectors are multi-state in that they report normal, fire or fault states to the radio base, which transmits the information to the interface. The radio bases and signalling devices are addressable and use a pre-set analogue value to report via the XP95 protocol. In addition to ‘normal’ and ‘fire’ signals, the bases can also indicate a low battery, a dirty detector, detector tamper and low signal strength fault conditions.

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OpenConnect from Apollo Achieves Full Integration of Fire Detection with BMS in a Single Device

Apollo Fire Detectors Ltd has developed a new product that allows fire detection to be fully integrated into building management systems (BMS) without the need for complex bespoke solutions or the use of multiple interfaces.

OpenConnect from Apollo integrates fire detection with BMS

OpenConnect from Apollo integrates fire detection with BMS

OpenConnect Gateway® is effectively a ‘plug and play’ device that can be incorporated into a fire control panel by the manufacturer. It takes the information from the control panel and relays it to the BMS using standard protocols such as BACnet™, Modbus® or LonWorks®. This brings system specifiers and end users all the benefits of inter-system communication; such as faster response times, co-ordinated strategies in case of emergency or failure, and pre-planned and pre-programmed evacuation procedures. Because it is an integral part of the fire control panel, it is also simple to install and reduces associated time and costs.

This integration solution has been developed in conjunction with Tridium and uses their well-established Niagra AX software framework, on which many building monitoring, automation and control applications are based. Apollo has also worked closely with leading fire panel manufacturers through its Panel Partnership and the OpenConnect protocol will be available to participating control panel manufacturers under licence. The licenced manufacturer will be able to develop their own software to incorporate this protocol and will provide a suitable physical connection between their panel and the OpenConnect Gateway. 

The new integration device is being made available in four base model options: 200 BMS points, 1,600 BMS points, 12,000 BMS points and 25,000 BMS points. For maximum integration, each OpenConnect Gateway includes as standard two Ethernet ports, an RS232 and RS484 port, a 15V dc input and two spare comms card slots.

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Apollo Fire Detectors Protect Australian Prison

Brisbane Women’s Correctional Centre and Wolston Correctional Centre, both located at Wacol in Queensland, Australia, have been equipped with a new Apollo-based fire detection system as part of an upgrade to the existing system. Ampac, who have been representing Apollo in the region since 1993, were responsible for designing and supplying the system, whilst Dayshelf Fire Systems were tasked with installation.

Apollo Fire Detectors products protect Australian women's prison

Apollo Fire Detectors products protect Australian women's prison

Brisbane Women’s Correctional Centre is the only assessment and placement centre for female prisoners in South East Queensland. The centre accommodates up to 258 prisoners across two accommodation areas – secure and residential cells. The Women’s Correctional Centre includes a purpose built-area that can accommodate those women who have been approved to have their children reside with them in custody. Adjacent is Wolston Correctional Centre, which houses 600 male inmates.

There are a number of particular considerations that have to be made when providing fire detection in such a facility, including evacuation procedures. Apollo’s analogue addressable technology will allow an alert to be accurately located and verified, and an evacuation can be avoided if not needed.

Ampac recommended Apollo’s XP95 system to meet the main fire detection requirements at the site. Dayshelf installed approximately 3,500 devices to meet the fire detection requirements, including more than 1,500 smoke detectors, 1,200 heat detectors and 500 interface units. The system is based around 46 networked Ampac control panels. The fire system has been integrated into the prison’s building management system using an Ampac controller interface card.

Due to the nature of the building, a phased replacement was necessary. Fire detection devices were changed as each panel was upgraded, which had to take place one at a time. The entire process took six months to complete.

Adam Lansdown at Dayshelf, said: “A false alarm at this facility could be dangerous, so the end client needed to be confident that the chosen fire detection was reliable and accurate. Dayshelf have grown to hold a majority share in the Gold Coast fire protection market and buy Apollo equipment from Ampac 95 per cent of the time.”

In addition to this large scale upgrade, Ampac are also pleased to announce the opening of a new Northern Territory Customer Service Office.

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Apollo Technology Protects History of Bristol

Apollo fire detection technology has been chosen to protect M Shed in Bristol; an exciting and innovative new museum that tells the story of Bristol’s history. The contract to supply, commission and maintain the fire detection system was awarded to Multi Alarm GB.

Apollo Fire Detectors Protect M Shed Museum in Bristol

Apollo Fire Detectors Protect M Shed Museum in Bristol

M Shed museum explores the city’s history from prehistoric times to the 21st century through extensive collections of objects, art and archives in addition to working exhibits on the harbourside, including steam trains and cranes. Situated on Bristol’s historic wharf, the museum is located in a 1950s transit shed, originally known as M Shed, which was designed to store goods imported into Bristol’s docks. M Shed is one of the few remaining buildings of its type in the country and has been redeveloped into Bristol’s only museum dedicated to the city’s history. This was possible thanks to an £11.6 million grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Covering 6000m2, M Shed has three permanent galleries named Bristol People, Bristol Places and Bristol Life; a rooftop gallery; a learning suite that is estimated to attract 20,000 school and community visitors each year; a maintenance and conservation workshop which opens onto the dockside allowing visitors to see the work going on inside; a café and gift shop.

The fire detection was the responsibility of Multi Alarm who recommended an Apollo-based system to meet the BS5839 L1 fire protection requirements. Around 350 Apollo Discovery devices have been installed to protect the museum, and these are controlled by a Multi Alarm 4 loop IFAX panel. The main point fire detection system interfaces with aspirating smoke detection which has been installed to protect the building’s large ceiling voids. In addition, the client required that the system was networked with the existing fire detection in the museum’s storage and refurbishment area next door, which is also based upon Apollo technology.

Derek Cooper, Surveyor at Multi Alarm, said: “A system was required that would allow mode changes to be made from the panel. This will enable the fire system to be adjusted to take account of activities in the museum workshop and working exhibits, such as steam trains, which may otherwise affect the reliability of the fire detection. We recommended Apollo’s Discovery detectors as they have been fully approved to operate in five different response modes.”

M Shed museum opened its doors for the first time on Friday 17th June 2011.

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Wireless Fire Detection With Xpander

Apollo has updated and extended its XPander range of wireless fire detectors. Designed for use in areas where hard-wired fire detection is impossible or impractical, XPander devices are ideal for use on construction or refurbishment sites.

Apollo extends its Xpander range of wireless smoke detectors

Apollo extends its Xpander range of wireless smoke detectors

Traditionally fire detection systems are installed once the building is complete and the main services are installed, yet it is still important to protect the building from major damage by fire during fit-out and alteration.

XPander can be used as part of an extension to a fixed fire system, so is ideal where works are ongoing as an extension or where temporary structures are in place. Buildings undergoing fire system refurbishment can also benefit from wireless devices: in this case the wireless fire detectors are used to provide temporary cover until the old fire system is decommissioned and a new hard-wired fire system can be installed.

The extended XPander range includes two new products and now consists of an optical smoke detector, a multisensor smoke detector, heat detector types A1R and CS, a wireless base, a manual call point, a sounder and a sounder beacon, and Single and Dual Input/Output Units. The complete range has been granted the new wireless link fire standard EN54 Part 25, which is the standard for European-compliant radio products.

Apollo’s wireless XPander has been designed to be used in conjunction with a standard fire detection system, being able to protect areas that require wireless technology. XPander has an updated 31-device loop interface and connects to an XP95-compatible control panel via an interface which is wired to the loop. No special adjustment or programming is required and the devices are recognised by the control panel simply as another detector connected to the system.

The detectors are multi-state in that they report normal, fire or fault states to the radio base, which transmits the information to the interface. The radio bases and signalling devices are addressable and use a pre-set analogue value to report via the XP95 protocol. In addition to ‘normal’ and ‘fire’ signals, the bases can also indicate a low battery, a dirty detector, detector tamper and low signal strength fault conditions.

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Apollo Technology Protects Queen Boudica

Apollo fire detection technology has been chosen to protect Norwich Castle Museum and Art Gallery and the Royal Norfolk Regimental Museum. T&P Fire Ltd, which has represented Apollo for more than 15 years, was appointed by Norfolk Property Services to replace the existing fire protection with an open protocol system.

Eddie Bean, Technical Manager at T&P Fire Ltd, says: “We have always advocated the open protocol approach, because it offers flexibility of product choice and better whole life costs. We recommended Apollo technology due to the high quality, range and reliability of Apollo products, which satisfied all of our client’s requirements for this historic site.”

Apollo Fire Detectors protects Norwich Castle Museum and Art Gallery

Apollo Fire Detectors protects Norwich Castle Museum and Art Gallery

James Carswell, Cabinet member for Cultural Services at Norfolk County Council, said: “Norwich Castle Museum and Art Gallery is so much more than just a building. It is a treasured part of our community loved by visitors and staff alike because it brings to life our heritage in a space fit for the 21st century, complete with state-of-the-art fire detection that secures the safety of our staff, visitors and valuable collections.”

Norwich Castle was built by the Normans 900 years ago, and is one of the city’s most famous landmarks. Originally a wooden fortification, surrounded by deep dry ditches for defence, the castle was later used as a prison. The castle complex is both a Scheduled Monument and a listed Grade I building. Today the castle is a museum and art gallery, housing collections of fine art, archaeology and natural history. One of the museum’s star collections is centered on East Anglia’s very own Queen Boudica; visitors can admire displays of Iceni gold and treasures and ride on a re-creation of an Iceni warrior’s chariot.

Attached to the castle by a First World War Communication Trench is the Royal Norfolk Regimental Museum. This museum traces the lives of the soldiers of the County Regiment and their families from 1685 onwards, through the items that have been collected from their campaigns; including a medal collection boasting three Victoria Crosses.

T&P Fire was appointed to supply, install, commission and maintain the new fire detection system. Installation was required on a like for like basis, and using the existing loop wiring. The work was programmed around the building’s occupants and requirements, mostly taking place during normal working hours.

The fire system replacement was split into two main areas; the Castle Museum and the Regimental Museum, Shirehall and Chambers at street level. More than 700 Apollo analogue addressable devices – including smoke and heat detectors, carbon monoxide detectors, audio visual devices and interfaces – have been installed altogether.

Within the Castle Museum and Art Gallery, around 300 Apollo Discovery fire detectors are configured across seven loops controlled by an Advanced Electronics Mx4807 panel. Nearly 100 interface devices allow the fire system to interact with other building systems, such as the sprinkler system and the Public Address Voice Alarm system, as well as access controlled doors and other critical plant. The main point fire detection system also interfaces with aspirating smoke detection which has been installed to protect the building’s large ceiling voids and the main castle keep.

The Regimental Museum and Shirehall are protected by a two-loop fire system, again based around an Advanced Electronics control panel, and incorporating 130 Apollo devices, while the Chambers has a four-loop system that includes more than 200 Apollo fire detectors, sounder beacons, base sounders and interfaces.

Designed to meet L1 standards, the fire systems offer a phased evacuation, with an alarm signal being raised in the affected area only.

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Apollo Technology Protects Slovenian Parliament

A new fire detection system based on Apollo technology has been chosen to protect the Slovenian Houses of Parliament; the home of the National Assembly and National Council. The contract for the fire detection system was awarded to Zarja Elektronika d.o.o., who have represented Apollo in Slovenia for over 20 years.

Apollo Fire Detectors protect Slovenian Houses of Parliament

Apollo Fire Detectors protect Slovenian Houses of Parliament

The parliamentary building, which was built in 1959, is located in the heart of the Slovenian capital city, Ljubljana. The building itself was designed by the architect Vinko Glanz. It includes a decorative main entrance that features symbolic, sculptural compositions depicting peaceful scenes from everyday life, focusing on industry and family. The premises include a seven-storey main building and three additional buildings, housing a total of approximately 500 staff. At the centre of the main building is the 422m2, 150-seat Great Hall, where the upper house convenes.

Bojan Kern, Development Engineer at Zarja Elektronika, says: “The client asked for full protection of their premises, which includes a number of buildings and covers a large area. In addition, the fire system had to preserve the architectural heritage of the building, as most rooms include decoration on the ceiling.”

Zarja recommended an Apollo-based fire detection system to meet EN54-14 standards. The main building is protected by almost 500 XP95 detectors, which are controlled by an 11-loop Zarja Elektronika NJP 2000A panel, and interfaces with 238 Apollo wireless XPander detectors. The three smaller surrounding buildings each have their own Zarja control panel NJP 401A and are protected by Apollo XP95 devices. All four control panels are connected to a common Graphic Control Centre.

Apollo’s XPander wireless range has been designed for use in areas where hard-wired fire detection is impossible or impractical, and is ideal for use in historic buildings, remote annexes and temporary structures. The Slovenian Houses of Parliament required wireless detection in order to preserve the building’s prized decorations in the main building. The XPander range should be used in conjunction with a standard fire detection system; no special adjustment or programming is required as the devices are recognised by the control panel simply as another detector connected to the system.

The historic fabric in some rooms was so precious that even wireless detection could not be mounted directly to the ceiling. Zarja designed a bespoke base unit, which requires only one screw to minimise the impact on the architectural heritage.

Bojan concludes: “Apollo fire detectors were perfect for this application – the products were simple to install and now provide the reassurance and reliability required to safeguard our politicians from the risk of fire. The wireless XPander range has a long enough battery life to be able to meet the client’s demands and provide quality fire detection without damaging the building’s ornate design features.”

With the addition of the Slovenian Houses of Parliament, Apollo technology is now protecting governments across Europe and the world, in locations as far afield as Dubai, Brazil and Norway.

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Apollo Pioneers Lifetime Guarantee For Fire Detection Products

Apollo Fire Detectors claims that the ability to assess the true lifecycle cost of a fire detection system is being compromised through lack of clear information about product life.

Apollo offers Lifetime Guarantee on Fire Detectors for reduced life cycle cost of fire protection systems

Apollo offers Lifetime Guarantee on Fire Detectors for reduced life cycle cost of fire protection systems

Richard Bramham, Marketing Director for Apollo, explains: “Understanding how long a fire detector can reasonably be expected to function is absolutely critical to assessing the lifecycle cost of a fire system. Currently, there is only very limited information available to specifiers and end users on this aspect, which makes true cost comparison at the procurement stage and the predicted maintenance costs extremely difficult to calculate. While there is no legal obligation to supply product lifetime information, any responsible manufacturer should have no problem divulging these details.”

BS5839, the industry code of practice, puts the onus on the manufacturer to define the working life of the product, along with requirements for servicing and maintenance. However, the amount of detail available can vary enormously from manufacturer to manufacturer.

Apollo Fire Detectors has demonstrated its commitment in this area by introducing a Product Lifetime Guarantee. This warranty covers Apollo products for their anticipated 10 year lifetime (5 years for CO detectors), which is the length of time the company says their products will function reliably if appropriately installed and maintained. Their Product Lifetime Guarantee is based on 30 years of experience in the industry and clearly shows that Apollo is confident about the quality of its manufacture – which continues to be based in the UK.

Richard Bramham says: “We are very proud of our British engineering heritage and of course the Product Lifetime Guarantee is a clear signal to our customers that we will back our own products all the way. But this is really a much wider industry issue – this is about transparency and responsible business practice.

“It’s important for installers, many of whom are small businesses, to know that they have the manufacturer’s full support in the event that any device malfunctions due to a manufacturing fault. Taking a broader view, in a world where resources are becoming scarcer and costs are rising, people have a right to understand exactly how much their fire system will cost – not just at the outset, but for the life of the building.”
 
Apollo also sees the issue of lifecycle costs as an area where knowledge within the fire industry is lacking. The company has recently completed a series of roadshows on this topic in conjunction with ADI Global Distribution and is also presenting a seminar at International Firex in May on ‘Life Cycle Costs in Fire Detection Systems’. In addition, Apollo now offers a CPD-approved training course on this topic.

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Top-Quality Fire Detection for China with new Apollo Beijing Office

Apollo Fire Detectors Ltd., one of the world’s leading manufacturers of fire detection solutions for commercial and industrial applications, has opened a new subsidiary office in Beijing. Mr. Kerry Zhang (Zhang Daqing) has been appointed as General Manager of Apollo (Beijing) Fire Products Co., Ltd. and will lead a local team to expand the company’s product offering and service range in the country’s growing fire protection market.

Apollo Fire Detectors opens new office in Beijing, appoints Kerry Zhang as General Manager of Apollo (Beijing) Fire Products Co., Ltd.

Apollo Fire Detectors opens new office in Beijing, appoints Kerry Zhang as General Manager of Apollo (Beijing) Fire Products Co., Ltd.

Mr. Zhang joined Apollo in March 2011, following previous experience in senior roles at Hilti and Black & Decker. His multinational career has seen him work extensively in China and Singapore.

He is confident that this new venture will be of great service to both Chinese and international businesses and, commenting on his appointment, said: “Apollo is a very high quality company, and offers some of the best fire protection products in the world. As the Chinese market for fire protection matures and grows, I look forward to bringing more and more of these products to the market here with Apollo Beijing. We have a strong team of people who are committed to the success of the business, and I am pleased to lead them in contributing to this goal.”

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Apollo Technology Chosen for £1 Billion Hospital Redevelopment

Apollo fire detection technology has been chosen to provide protection for the new Royal London Hospital, which will be Britain’s biggest new hospital and home to a range of specialist centres, including London’s leading trauma and emergency care centre and one of the UK’s major children’s hospitals. The hospital’s state-of-the-art facilities will provide world class healthcare to an area undergoing significant regeneration. Work is ongoing, with the hospital opening in December 2011, and more than 7,500 Apollo devices are already installed on site.

Apollo Fire Detection technology chosen for new Royal London Hospital

Apollo Fire Detection technology chosen for new Royal London Hospital

The Royal London is part of Barts and the London NHS Trust, which consists of St Bartholomew’s Hospitals and the London Chest Hospital. The Trust is in the middle of delivering a £1 billion new hospitals development – the largest in the world. The first phase saw the opening in March 2010 of the Bart’s Cancer Centre. Following the opening of the new Royal London Hospital later this year, the project will be completed with the opening of a specialist cardiac centre at Barts in 2016. The main contractor on the project is Skanska and the fire system contract was awarded to Static Systems Group plc.

Continuity of care
Barts and the London has one of the best patient survival records in the NHS. The Royal London Hospital provides district general hospital services for the City and Tower Hamlets and specialist tertiary care services for patients from across East London and beyond.  More than 868,000 visitors passed through its doors in 2009-10.

The Royal London was founded in 1740 and has gradually expanded to occupy a number of buildings on its site in Whitechapel. The new development replaces a number of the old buildings with a coherent structure, purpose-built to support the delivery of 21st century clinical care. The design is sympathetic to the hospital’s historic buildings, which are being retained, including the landmark facade on Whitechapel Road.

The new hospital comprises one 16-storey and one 17-storey tower, known as South and Centre, and the 10-storey North tower. The Centre Tower is equipped with a helipad for London’s Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS), which is based at the hospital. Each of the three towers is served at ground level by a main lobby giving access to the lifts and staircase.

Fire protection
Meeting the hospital’s highly complex set of fire protection and evacuation requirements was the responsibility of Static Systems Group, who were awarded the contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of the system. The comprehensive fire detection system is designed around Static Systems’ Series 900 panel, which is ideal for phased installation and occupation.

37 fire alarm panels have been provided in total, with two panels protecting each floor of the hospital except at ground level, where three control panels are installed. Each panel controls approximately 20 fire alarm zones, although this varies depending on the floor and tower with the lower floors having a greater number of zones per panel. Main control of the fire alarm network is from the Fire Command Centre, which has also been supplied with a sprinkler data gathering unit which registers activation and status of sprinkler flow switches and zone isolation valves throughout the building.

Due to the complex nature of the building and the setting, a number of interfaces were included in the project design. They enable other critical equipment to be activated in the event of an alarm, including automatic fire dampers, cold smoke extract systems, lifts, generators, oil & gas valves, door closers and air handling units. In addition a modem link was created with St Bartholomew’s Hospital, which is two miles away, to alert the Royal London in the event of an emergency.

Approximately 5,000 Apollo Discovery Multisensors and 2,500 XP95 mains switching Input/Output Units have been installed to date to protect the 675-bed hospital.

Chris Smith, Systems Engineering Manager at Static Systems, said:
“When you have a project that is on such a large scale, you want a reliable system that is easy to configure. Our panels give us flexibility to network and install the system over time”.

“Apollo’s analogue addressable technology gave us the reliability and flexibility to meet the client’s requirements on this demanding project, whilst its open protocol gives us the ability to mix and match products to meet the specific needs of the site. It also future-proofs the fire system because Apollo analogue addressable devices are forwards compatible so any future system extension and maintenance will be simple to achieve.”

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